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sweaty masks




In Japan, the wearing of face masks is as popular as eating sushi for dinner. Everyone's at it.

The main function of the mask is to hide your face from other people so that they don't know what you're thinking. They are also used in bank raids.

In Japan, it is thought best not to give too much away regarding one's feelings, either through the use of larynx movements, or through the display of body gesticulations. That way, no one will be troubled by another person's negative words or actions, and social harmony will therefore be maintained. Nice.

The face is seen as a window into the soul, and if the owner of the face is unable to hide their emotions, then a mask will be used to do the job instead. If you were to grab the mask of an unsuspecting wearer and yank it politely from their face, you'd probably find they're trying to hide either a big cheesy grin or a picture of quiet sadness (or possibly some facial tics). On second thoughts, they'll probably have a really pissed off look, seeing that you've just yanked it from their face. So forget that idea.

So it can be said with a high degree of certainty that people wearing face masks are either a) hiding their emotions, or b) running from a bank.

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On Saturday, 04 February, 2006, Blogger Maethelwine said:

Actually, a fairly large number of these people appear to be lepers, the poor souls. You can, if you watch them closely, occasionally spy bits of wasted lip and nose tumbling out the side of the masks onto their shirtfronts. Life is so horribly cruel.  



On Sunday, 05 February, 2006, Blogger rocks said:

Now, why couldn't I have lived over there when I was going through my "breaking out like a 14 year old" stage, these would have been perfect!  



On Monday, 06 February, 2006, Anonymous Jason said:

I know in China people wear these masks when they're sick as not to give other people the bug. Not sure if it's the same in Japan or not.  



On Monday, 06 February, 2006, Blogger jh said:

Maethelwine and Jason can't possibly be correct. I'd wager the masks are there to hide the dental work.  



On Wednesday, 08 February, 2006, Blogger Mrs DC said:

I've got one that makes me look like a killer, for snowboarding.

I had a friend from the philipines who wore one just when he was cold, too.  



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