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colonel greaser

They really go for Christmas big time in Japan. The decorations, the festive songs, Christmas cake, rampant commercialism. Everything except the religious bits. Just like back home in the UK then.

Instead of turkey, many people in Osaka form orderly queues at their local KFC and indulge in some greasy chicken leftovers, deep-fried and covered in breadcrumbs. Mmmmmm!

Even better, Colonel Saunders, the bearded old fella standing stiff as a board outside KFC, dons a Santa outfit, beckoning people into his establishment with a lecherous grin and oily fingers.




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On Saturday, 10 December, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said:

I grew up in Osaka (now in the States) and your post reminded me of my good old memory of eating KFC for Christmas. When I was kids. Now that I am almost 30, I tried to avoid at any cost to eat KFC, though I must admit, KFC in Japan tastes a lot better than the ones in here. Great blog!  



On Saturday, 10 December, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said:

I grew up in states (now in the Osaka) and your post reminded me of my good old memory of eating KFC for Christmas (not!). When I had kid(s). Now that I am almost 60, 70, 80 etc, I try to avoid at any cost to eat KFC, McD etc though I must admit, KFC McD etc in US tastes a lot better than the one in here Osaka. Blog. blog, blog!  



On Saturday, 10 December, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said:

PS. After I eat KFC, McD etc I get severely constipated or diarriarred etc.  



On Saturday, 10 December, 2005, Blogger Natalie said:

Ahhhh, you beat me to it. I've been meaning to get a pic of the Red and White clad Southern Colonel. Being from the U.S. and the South in particular I was amazed to see these relics. They are considered way too un-PC to be placed in front of restaurants anymore. We don't even have his pic anymore and as they are all called KFC today's youngsters (I can use that phrase because I turned 40 this week) don't even know that it stands for Kentucky Fried Chicken. Ain't Japan great (or just out there)!  



On Sunday, 11 December, 2005, Anonymous Woody said:

I'd love to see a close-up shot of that menu board. Looks pretty complicated compared to our menus over here in the United States consisting of names with prices, and one or two photos of the current items they're really pushing.  



On Monday, 12 December, 2005, Blogger RisingSlowly said:

In my heady youth, I once stole Col Sanders from outside the Zushi KFC branch. We lugged him down the road, leant him against a phone,[this was before cell phones] called KFC and said,"Hi, it's the Colonal. I'm lost. I can see a Daei and that's it"
Tee hee.....two workers rushed out of the restaurant and came and retrieved the Col.
Tee hee.
God, I was a twat.  



On Friday, 16 December, 2005, Anonymous footloose said:

Love the story about the stolen colonel, Fish. Was anyone in Kyoto over the Gion Matsuri? The colonels were decked out in traditional blue-white yukata - I love how kitsch in Japan seems to be slapped on layer by layer, until you can't tell what was the original...or for that matter, crispy. Keep your eyes peeled over hatsumoude.  



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