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computers not needed

When it comes to showing visual representations of events, many Japanese news programmes often dispense with hi-tech computer graphics in favour of more lo-tech methods, using souvenirs brought back from family holidays.

Take this morning's news coverage regarding the terrible events in London last week. It may not be state-of-the-art, but there's no doubting that their imaginative use of a toy bus and coloured-in bits of paper has cleverly captured the full horror of the tragedy in a way that the BBC never could.




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On Wednesday, 13 July, 2005, Anonymous dotty said:

Thank you for your analysis of Japan's media coverage of last week's events. I have to say, if it hadn't been for the detailed diagram, I might never have understood excatly what happened. I'm in Spain - on the news here they show you dismembered body parts and beheadings. On a brighter note, they also show you naked people making a show of themselves at public events.  



On Wednesday, 13 July, 2005, Blogger Lewis said:

Good point about the random cardboard cutouts on the news. What on earth is all that about? The irony is that when they show the weather forecast they use a virtual studio with loads of fancy computer animations. Yet for serious coverage of terroist attacks it's all plastic buses and sticky-back plastic.  



On Wednesday, 13 July, 2005, Anonymous dotty said:

Lewis raises a good point. Do you think they ship ex Blue Peter presenters out to Japan to make the cardboard cut outs? What with their expert knowledge and all. If so, do you think they then recycle them into models of Tracey Island to send to the starving children of Africa?  



On Thursday, 14 July, 2005, Blogger Maethelwine said:

I don't know who is making the cutouts, but oh the raw power of it all! Those spiky little flames frighten me. I hope no children saw this.  



On Sunday, 17 July, 2005, Blogger Spo said:

genius - only in Japan  



On Friday, 16 December, 2005, Anonymous Raymon Meckler said:

Good blog. Keep it running!  



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